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Author Topic: mixing advice area  (Read 1360 times)

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March 04, 2011, 02:32:04 PM
Is it just me, or does it seem funny that there's no area for general mixing advice? This forum seems to be gathering a community of people from all levels of mixing skill, and a place to discuss techniques/tips would probably be really useful. I don't know if some of the more professional/skilled people want to hold on to their "trade secrets", but others (like myself) could really benefit from the interaction with mixers better than them. Correct me if I'm wrong, or if this just isn't the site for beginners to learn.

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March 04, 2011, 03:04:25 PM
I'm considering adding two sections, one with links to mixing advice and resources, such as videos and books, online resources, etc. Then the other section would be related to general mixing inquiries.

My hope is that the mixoffs will generate conversation about mixing techniques, with concrete examples, since we all have access to the tracks and mixes. It has always seemed a bit abstract to discuss some element of mixing or recording without something to reference, if that makes sense.

But yes, there will be some recording advice related stuff. I don't, however, want this site to become too thinly spread. I think the site will have more value if it stays focused around mxoffs and related topics.

Thanks!

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March 06, 2011, 05:21:59 AM
I agree with you Signboy. Us Audio/Mix Engineers won't or don't give up our trade secrets and I'm willing to go out on a limb and say its because we've worked so very hard to get where we are that we're not just gonna give you our pocket rockets without you figuring out why and how we do it. Just like any instrument the more you play the better you get. Well....."the more you mix"......I will give you and other beginning mixheads this tho, first thing to do is learn all about mixing, placement and frequency. your dealing with sound not just waves, find out why people put a room reverb on snare or a plate vrb on vocals, or use a gate on a HH (Hi Hat) or toms. Or the simple power of panning (snare, hh, backround vocals, (not all the way to 100) etc. That's just an ice breaker. When you look at the big picture your gonna realize your dealing with an iceburg and you better be ready to make a faster left turn then the Titanic or you'll find yourself at the bottom real quick. A great book to start with is Mixing Audio by Roey Izhaki. It's wonderful and will help you tremendously on your mixing journey. Also, good practice is take a kick track and add all sorts of stuff, play around and see what happens. How does +6db shelved at 60hz with a que of 1, -6db at 250hz with a que of 2, +3db at 3k with a que of 1 sound like? Again you may have a great audio mix but when you add the vocals shit starts to sound funny. Why? Anyway, you have the world at your finger tips (internet) Learn!! Learn!! and Learn!! It can only get better. Oh yeah...get the book.

Monkey
« Last Edit: March 06, 2011, 05:29:28 AM by Audio Monkey »
Mix It!

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March 06, 2011, 11:11:23 AM
Is it just me, or does it seem funny that there's no area for general mixing advice? This forum seems to be gathering a community of people from all levels of mixing skill, and a place to discuss techniques/tips would probably be really useful. I don't know if some of the more professional/skilled people want to hold on to their "trade secrets", but others (like myself) could really benefit from the interaction with mixers better than them. Correct me if I'm wrong, or if this just isn't the site for beginners to learn.

In addition to reading up as much as you can about mixing (Sound On Sound Magazine website www.soundonsound.com  is a great resource BTW - they have lots of archive material that you can access for free - If the magazine is over 6 months old, you can read it on the web for free - especially check out their "Mix Rescue" articles)
Here's my other suggestion, signboy... Start critiquing mixes.  You might think "I don't know much about mixing, so how can I critique?" - Well, I'm sure you know how professionally produced music should sound (you've listened to it all your life, right?) - so start from there.... Listen to mixes that people put up & say to yourself: "What's right with it? What's wrong with it?"... & then write down your thoughts in reply to whatever thread you're listening to.  You don't have to be super-technical, just be as descriptive as you can & express what you hear - the technical terminology will come with time & knowledge...
Mixing is all about ear training, & take it from me, this is the best way to do it. (outside of working fulltime in a professional recording studio)  As you gather knowledge about the mixing process from what you read, you'll be able to recognize quickly, not only what a mix needs, but how to give it the things it needs.
When you put your mixes up - ask people to critique them... If you are willing to comment on their mixes, they are likely to be inclined to return the favour.  Be prepared for some blunt assessments, but swallow you pride & learn to take on board the criticism.

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May 02, 2011, 06:59:07 AM
While i tend to scoff at the term "trade secrets", as they aren't really secrets anymore, it does take a lot of time actually mixing to understand how these "secrets" work together: which is where this site comes in.

It can be a good thing for people with less experience to ask for help and offer advice on things they have learned to help consolidate their learning...

but I am of the opinion that if someone is "pro" and they sign up to a forum such as this, get off the "better than thou" high-horse and offer help, advice and opinions from time to time: this is the idea of the site.

Sites such as this become nodes to this knowledge arpund the web, but sometimes a "you should take out a bit of 270Hz in the bass" for someone who has read up on eq is lot more helpful than "read up on eq".

Fhumble has it about right for lesser experienced people, start critiquing mixes, really listen to them. Even if you can't nail something spot-on, at the start being able to identify that something is not quite right with a particular instrument is good.

Maybe i am starting to ramble, i should leave the pub :P
Republic of Western Australia

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May 02, 2011, 10:13:09 AM
There are no secrets!. Ask away is my advice, if you are a regular posting up mixes and giving feedback, I dont see why you shouldnt get the answers your looking for ;)
Even if not so experienced recordists/mixers ask for "secrets" is still gonna take them years to perfect the impact it has.
Just course you know all the secrets doesnt make you a good recordist or mixer only talent and experience does. :)
 

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