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Author Topic: Interesting EQ trick  (Read 6536 times)

  • *****
July 08, 2012, 02:53:15 PM
Learned this from a magazine the other day, nothing too out of the ordinary, but useful!

If you're trying to eq out some noise, or resonance, try duplicating the track, then invert the phase on the duplicated track. Now, solo both tracks. You should hear nothing, until you start to eq. As you cut a freq from the first track, you'll start to hear just that which you are cutting. Now you can adjust the center freq and the q to get your noise, etc. Mute the duplicate track, and you'll hear the original track with the cut taken out.

I found this trick quite useful for finding the exact freq and q that I wanted to remove some weird ring from a kick yesterday, and for getting rid of an upper mid distortion that was too grating on a guitar.


  • ****
July 09, 2012, 11:21:09 AM
 8)

  • ****
July 09, 2012, 12:56:04 PM
Awesome!! thx!  :D  8)

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  • **
July 10, 2012, 08:16:11 AM
Thanx John!

  • ****
July 10, 2012, 10:46:52 AM
Now that I think of it this could also prove a good self educational purpose: One will literally hear what they're EQ:ing so they would also (hopefully) realize if they're really EQ:ing out the thing they think they're suppose to.

For what I've seen many engineers seem EQ stuff out either too low or too high (depending which end of the spectrum one's working on): they put a 200 Hz high-pass filter on a muddy vocal when the actual problem might be around 450 Hz or cut huge amounts of high end from an electric guitar when the ear-piercing frequency might be centered at 4,5 kHz.

This is slightly offtopic but I've noticed that usually problem frequencies lies closer to the center of hearing spectrum than many seem to perceive. That's why I feel that
working with the absolute center spectrum (1-2 kHz) is the hardest part.
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  • ****
July 10, 2012, 10:38:15 PM
That's why I have Auratones ...

  • *****
July 10, 2012, 11:35:05 PM
I imagine this trick could be useful for hearing the effect of compression, too, or saturation. I'll have to give it a spin with those and see if it's any help!

  • No avatar
  • **
July 18, 2012, 06:00:21 PM
I imagine this trick could be useful for hearing the effect of compression, too, or saturation. I'll have to give it a spin with those and see if it's any help!

That could be pretty neat with saturation. You could hear the harmonics that you are generating!

With compression, you can definitely get some interesting effects doing this. You can actually create a gate with only a compressor with this method  8)
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  • ****
July 19, 2012, 02:35:19 AM
FWIW, and I don't know if Adobe Audition does it, but Cool Edit Pro allows you to hear only the envelope, or only the noise, etc., in native plugs such as compression and noise-reduction ...

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  • *
August 08, 2012, 11:27:23 PM
That is a very cool trick. Thx. ;D