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Author Topic: Mixoff Contest with Mike Senior - Win Mike's New Book!  (Read 196453 times)

April 04, 2011, 04:42:37 AM

EDIT:mix removed...email signup working now.

This is an unusal request...A friend of mine is trying to sign up on this site however the forum blocks his email as spam and the email wont work for signing up.

I want to post his mix for him untill the email thing is sorted out...contest deadline is today and time is running out.

This is not my mix

This mix was done by a guy named Paulo

I PM'd admin about email not working for him.

 



« Last Edit: April 04, 2011, 08:18:41 PM by Vincent »

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April 04, 2011, 05:44:03 AM
Mike -
Here's my revised mix:
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/24660599/blood_to_bone_MIX_040411.mp3

Thanks again for all your time & effort.

Cheers
Malcolm

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April 04, 2011, 06:36:14 AM
http://soundcloud.com/pc999/young-grifo-blood-to-bone

Any chance you can enable the download link for the file. I can't get at it at the moment, I'm afraid.
Thanks!
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
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April 04, 2011, 06:39:12 AM
Here is my mix: http://soundcloud.com/studioimp/studioimp-younggriff

Is this link active? Soundcloud is giving me an error message.
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
Free Mixing Resources On-line!

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April 04, 2011, 06:45:01 AM
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=1156764

I can't seem to download a file of the mix, which I need to do to listen to things on my studio machine (which isn't net-connected). Anything you can do? Thanks!
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
Free Mixing Resources On-line!

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April 04, 2011, 06:56:07 AM
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/24660599/blood_to_bone_MIX_040411.mp3

What a drop! I just wish I hadn't been taking a sip of my tea at the end of mid-section 2. It wasn't pretty.  ;D

Quote
Thanks again for all your time & effort.

My pleasure. More than worth it for a drop like that. I had to listen to it again three times straight away. That's a serious stunt you've pulled there. Love it!
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
Free Mixing Resources On-line!

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April 04, 2011, 08:35:09 AM
Here's my mix, didn't go too far out with adding things etc. I was going to do some harmonies on the lead vox for the chorus, but then I caught a really brutal cold and lost my voice! YYYARG!

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/23356772/BTB%20Antmix1%20M1.mp3

Cheers :)

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April 04, 2011, 08:42:16 AM
http://soundcloud.com/draves69/blood-to-bone

Well, I think the competition for most sub on a mix has just been sewn up! :) Seriously, though, there's way too much going on here in the bottom octave-and-half. Even setting aside the fact that the references have nothing like that amount of sub, there are good practical reasons for reining it in. Firstly, you'll have difficulty reaching a competitive loudness at mastering, because low end is usually the main headroom bottleneck. Secondly, you won't be able to turn it up as far on a full-range playback system before the subwoofer parts company with its cabinet. And, thirdly, a lot of small playback systems will distort unmusically at what feels to the user like a comparatively 'safe' listening level, simply because the speaker/headphone driver is trying so hard to recreate signals that are beyond its capabilities.

Speculating for a moment, this low-end issue leads me to wonder whether you're carrying out sufficient small-speaker checks on your mixes. On both of the small speakers I've got permanently rigged up in my own system, the kick-drum all but disappears during the choruses, which makes the rhythm feel rather lop-sided. And those are still three-inch and four-inch cones -- I'd expect a laptop speaker or pair of earbuds to fare even less well. Irrespective of whether you feel you need to hear the kick on small speakers, though, the very high sub levels do make it quite difficult psychologically to judge other aspects of the balance on nearfields, so checking on small speakers would help to clarify your mixing decisions regarding the rest of the musical arrangement. (I also wonder whether your own monitors are adding distortion artefacts to the low frequencies, as a lot of mid-market ported speakers do, so that they seem fuller in the midrange than they actually are, because I notice that the bass is also very much focused at the low end, and while it's audible on the smalls, it does come across as rather dull.)

Regardless of this overall tonality issue, however, I also think the bass sound could dominate slightly less in the lower midrange, because it leaves the guitars sounding a bit thin, where I'd hope for them to have more subjective power. This is exacerbated by a certain amount of 400-800Hz scoop in the mix tone as a whole and a bit of hyping in the upper octave (the latter presumably partly in order to balance the heavyweight low end). The problem of vocal sibilance also raises its head for similar reasons, but the esses still feel out of line even if I try to compensate somewhat for the mix's general timbre using master-buss EQ. De-essing looks like the order of the day there.

Beyond the issues with the kick drum, there are a couple of things I'd look to tweak with the rest of the kit. Top of my list would probably be to round out the snare a bit, so that the attack is pulled lower in the balance and the sustain elements therefore take a relatively more important role. This might also address what feels like a slightly low overheads level too, but those tracks might need a bit of a boost and/or some additional compression too. The toms seem pretty well balanced, although it sounds a little strange that they don't have the same kind of sense of reverb as the snare in verse 2. (I also found it a little off-putting to hear the snare coming slightly from the left, although I realise that in a real kit it is indeed to one side and I know that some engineers (Andy Wallace, for instance) do like to crack the panning of central instruments a fraction off-centre to aid separation.)

I quite like the way you've dealt with the vocals (sibilance issues notwithstanding), which are well-controlled dynamically and nice and wide-screen, despite the remaining waywardness in the tuning department. However, I think the reverb has too much high end to it, which means we're getting an unwelcome George Michael-style reverb 'hiss' on consonants. (Aaaaaa... tschoo!!! Sorry -- I'm allergic. :)) In a general sense, though, I like your effects use here, which sounds like it involves a number of short 'under the hood' enhancement patches in addition to the longer tails. The guitars begin to sound a bit washed out in the mid-sections, though, so whatever you're adding there could be backed off a couple of decibels.

One of the things I like most about this mix is that you've managed to give a respectable sense of stereo width, while still retaining good mono-compatibility -- I think it's one of the best examples I've heard so far in this respect. It's not that nothing changes in mono (you can't have no change at all), but the changes all seem relatively benign and don't appear to dramatically impact on the character of the mix sound or balance. Good work there! The only real casualty of the switch to mono, in fact, appears to be the BVs, but I'm not sure that's much of a disaster in the grand scheme of things.

Thanks for this mix -- it's nice to see a real advance in the mono-compatibility stakes in particular.
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
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April 04, 2011, 09:07:17 AM

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April 04, 2011, 09:42:51 AM
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/21986881/Blood%20to%20Bonemp3.mp3

I'm afraid I missed that you'd posted a WAV, and critiqued from the MP3. Still, that didn't stop me liking your mix a lot -- it's a good solid balance which lots of good individual timbral decisions. Blend is excellent, and there's a nice sense of size too -- wetter than Daunt's balance, for example, but no less valid for that. Criticisms from a balance perspective are therefore pretty few and far between: the vocal is perhaps a bit muffled, and I'd probably look to add a little 2kHz to bring it forward; the hard-panned toms image doesn't really fit with the cymbals presentation in the overheads; and there seems to be a note clash on the final 'bone' of both vocal choruses (a slip of the Melodyne? :)) between the lead and double-track, plus there's some distracting flamming between the consonants. Really good work, though, in the main.

Beyond that, though, there are some elements of the long-term dynamics of the choruses which could do with a tweak. The problem is that at the moment the first two feel like a little bit of a let-down in the context of the verse material that precedes them. A big part of this is I think to do with the vocal levels, which are probably over-pushed in the verses, and a little under-balanced in the choruses. However, the guitar and bass levels might also benefit from rising slightly in those choruses too, and a little more buss compression might actually assist too, if my own experiments here are anything to go by. (Incidentally, I'd expected that buss compression might actually be counterproductive in this instance, but you never can tell anything for sure with audio processing until you try it out!)

That said, listening to the killer long-term dynamics moment at the beginning of the final choruses, I was surprised how well this worked, as it didn't initially seem that you'd added anything to the arrangement. However, listening more closely, it sounds like you've edited together a 'fake' double-track for the main guitar riff in the chorus, or used some kind of ADT, and this really makes a difference. The wide panning of these elements, though, does rather reduce the benefits in mono, so I'm not sure I'd be ready to proclaim this a complete solution just yet.

Overall mix tonality isn't bad at all -- in particular you've managed to navigated a good course between 'bright' and 'harsh' in the mid-sections where the guitars and cymbals start giving it some elbow grease. However, I'd scoop out a couple of decibels around 300Hz and give a little more emphasis to the 8kHz region myself. Much more of a concern is the mono compatibility, because this mix suffers quite badly when summed to a single channel. The high end of the cymbals in particular really dives, while the guitars also lose quite a lot of brightness and the vocals sacrifice some important 'air' frequencies. Looking at the top three octaves of the mix on a vectorscope, I'm wondering whether you've been applying some kind of high-frequency M&S-based stereo-widening effect, because the display 'blob' looks consistently flatter than I'd expect. I realise that some people are willing to take a tonal hit at the high end in mono in return for greater 'sparkly width' in stereo, but even if this is your aim I still think you've probably overdone it.

All in all, though, this is a very capable mix indeed, and while it's not perhaps as overtly inventive as some of those we've heard already, it does provide an excellent showcase of the band's material and shows that you clearly know what you're doing.
Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio
A complete mixing method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.
Free Mixing Resources On-line!